Proud Partner of Oregon Humane Society

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BSPR@windermere.com

About The Oregon Humane Society

Local Focus, National Impact.

For almost 150 years, the Oregon Humane Society (OHS) has advocated for those who cannot speak for themselves – and the nonprofit organization is a national leader in animal rescue, welfare, and legislation efforts. Founded in 1868, OHS is the oldest humane society in the West and the third oldest in the nation. For the past six years, OHS has rescued, rehabilitated, and rehomed over 11,000 animals annually – more than any other shelter on the West Coast. OHS is also a leader in progressive programs, including their Holman Medical Center, Technical Rescue Team (OHSTAR), humane education outreach, Spay & Save Program, and Oregon State’s only animal cruelty law enforcement officers. Oregon State ranks among the nation’s top three states for animal protection laws and OHS is proud to be a driving force behind strengthening laws to protect animals and punish abusers.

How Oregon Humane helped in 2016:

In 2016, OHS found homes for 11,614 pets and their Second Chance Program helped 6,328 animals from 92 organizations from as far away as Louisiana and Hawaii. These animals had been overlooked for adoption at other shelters, but thanks to OHS, they all found loving families. OHS’ Spay & Save Program, which offers free and low-cost surgeries for cats owned by low-income families and feral cat caregivers, spayed and neutered 9,376 cats in 2016. This program is credited with a 44% decline in the number of cats brought into Portland-area shelters.

The OHS Holman Medical Center performed 12,138 surgeries in 2016, including its 100,000th surgery since it opened its doors in 2007. The Holman Medical Center, in partnership with Oregon State University College of Veterinary Medicine, was the nation’s first veterinary teaching hospital that worked directly with an animal shelter. In 2016, the Holman Center provided valuable hands-on training for 89 veterinary students who completed a rotation at OHS. The hospital was also one of only a handful of humane society veterinary facilities to receive top marks from the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA).

OHS’ Investigations Department responded to 1,115 new animal cruelty cases that involved 2,995 animals – an increase of 29% over the prior year. OHSTAR participated in 30 rescue deployments, and OHS’ educational programs reached 14,091 people last year. The OHS Training and Behavior Department provided 115 shelter animals with extensive behavioral assistance and 1,365 people attended OHS training classes and workshops.

For more information and current events visit: www.oregonhumane.org

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